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ALABAMA

Admitted
December 14, 1819
Order - 22nd
Seceded
January 11, 1861
4th of 11 states
Readmission
June 25, 1868
3rd of 11 states
Home of the Alibamon Indians of the Creek confederacy. First European Permanent Settlement: 1702;Territory by Act of March 3, 1817, effective Aug. 15, 1817; Capitol: Montgomery; National Representatives: 7 seats; Electoral Votes: 9
ALASKA

Admitted
January 3, 1959
Order - 49th
The Russians adopted the word meaning "great lands" or "land that is not an island" from the Aleutian word alakshak. First European Permanent Settlement: 1784; A district from Oct. 18, 1867, until it became an organized territory Aug. 24, 1912; Capitol: Juneau; Administrative Divisions: 23 Divisions; National Representatives: 1 seat; Electoral Votes: 3
ARIZONA

Admitted
February 14, 1912
Order - 48th
The Spanish coined the name either from the Pima Indian word meaning "little spring" or from the Aztec arizuma, meaning "silver-bearing." First European Permanent Settlement: 1776; This region was sometimes called Arizona before 1863, although it was still in the Territory of New Mexico; Capitol: Phoenix; Administrative Divisions: 15 Counties; National Representatives: 5 seats; Electoral Votes: 7
ARKANSAS

Admitted
June 15, 1836
Order - 25th
Seceded:
May 6, 1861
9th of 11 States
Readmission:
June 22, 1868
2nd of 11 States
Once the territory of the Siouan Quapaw down-stream people, Arkansas is the French derivative of this Indian name. The territory was larger than the state. After statehood the leftover area to the west had post offices that continued for some years to use an Arkansas abbreviation in the postmarks, although they were really in the "Indian Country." First European Permanent Settlement: 1686; Capitol: Little Rock; Administrative Divisions: 75 Counties; National Representatives: 4 seats; Electoral Votes: 6
CALIFORNIA

Admitted
September 9, 1850
Order - 31st;
The name of a fictitious earthly paradise in Las Serged de Esplandian, a sixteenth-century Spanish romance. It is believed that Spanish conquistadors named this state.Ceded by Mexico by the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, concluded Feb. 2, 1848, and proclaimed July 4, 1848. From then until statehood, California had a military government until Dec. 20, 1849, and then a local civil government. It never had a territorial form of government.First European Permanent Settlement: 1769; Capitol: Sacramento; Administrative Divisions: 58 Counties; National Representatives: 45 Seats; Electoral Votes: 47
COLORADO

Admitted
August 1, 1876
Order - 38th
A Spanish word for "red" the name Colorado first referred to the Colorado River. First European Permanent Settlement: 1858; Capitol: Denver; Administrative Divisions: 63 Counties; National Representatives: 6 seats; Electoral Votes: 8
CONNECTICUT

Admitted
January 9, 1788
5th of the 13 original States.
The Algonquin and Mohican Indian word for "long river place." First European Permanent Settlement: 1634; Capitol: Hartford; Administrative Divisions: 8 Counties; National Representatives: 6 seats; Electoral Votes: 8
DELAWARE

Admitted
December 7, 1787
First of the 13 original States
This version of the name of Lord De La Warr, a governor of Virginia, was first used to name the Delaware River and later adopted by the Europeans to rename the local Indians, originally called the Lenni-Lenape. First European Permanent Settlement: 1638; Capitol: Dover; Administrative Divisions: 3 Counties; National Representatives: 1 seat; Electoral Votes: 3
FLORIDA

Admitted
March 3, 1845
Order - 27th
Seceded
January 10, 1861
3rd of 11 states
Readmission
June 25, 1868
4th of 11 states
In his search for the "Fountain of Youth," Ponce de Leon named this region "flowery Easter" or "feast of flowers" on Easter Sunday, 1513. First European Permanent Settlement: 1565; Capitol: Tallahassee; Administrative Divisions: 67 Counties; National Representatives: 19 seats; Electoral Votes: 21
GEORGIA

Admitted
January 2, 1788
4th of the 13 original States
Seceded
January 19, 1861
5th of 11 states
Readmission
June 25, 1868
5th of 11 states
Readmitted a second time
July 15, 1870
Named for King George II of England, who granted James Oglethorpe a charter to found the colony of Georgia in 1732. First European Permanent Settlement: 1733; Capitol: Atlanta; Administrative Divisions: 159 Counties; National Representatives: 10 seats; Electoral Votes: 12
HAWAII

Admitted
August 21, 1959
Order - 50th
Commonly believed to be an English adaptation of the native word for "homeland," hawaiki or owhyhee. Hawaii was a peaceful independent kingdom, subjugated by coercion and subterfuge by foreign moneyed planting interests and the US Navy, which needed a mid-Pacific repair and coaling station, the illegality being still under protest by the native peoples. The territorial date Aug. 12, 1898 is that of the formal transfer to the United States, with Sanford B. Dole as first Governor. First European Permanent Settlement: 1820; Capitol: Honolulu; Administrative Divisions: 4 Counties; National Representatives: 2 seats; Electoral Votes: 4
IDAHO

Admitted
July 3, 1890
Order - 43rd
A name coined by the state meaning "gem of the mountains" or "light on the mountains." Originally the name Idaho was to be used for the Pike's Peak mining territory in Colorado, and later for the mining territory of the Pacific Northwest. Others believe the name derives from the Kiowa Apache word for the Comanche. First European Permanent Settlement: 1842; Capitol: Boise; Administrative Divisions: 44 Counties; National Representatives: 2 seats; Electoral Votes: 4
ILLINOIS

Admitted
December 3, 1818
Order - 21st
From the French version of the Alonquin word meaning "men" or "soldiers" Illini. First European Permanent Settlement: 1720; Capitol: Springfield; Administrative Divisions: 102 Counties; National Representatives: 22 seats; Electoral Votes: 24
INDIANA

Admitted
December 11, 1816
Order - 19th
"Land of the Indians" The name was coined in 1800 when Congress carved the new state of Ohio from the Northwest Territory, and designated the remaining area as the Indiana Territory. The territorial name was retained when Indiana became a state in 1816. First European Permanent Settlement: 1733; Capitol: Indianapolis; Administrative Divisions: 92 Counties; National Representatives: 10 seats; Electoral Votes: 12
IOWA

Admitted
December 28, 1846
Order - 29th
The Sioux word for "one who puts to sleep" or "beautiful land." First European Permanent Settlement: 1788; Capitol: Des Moines; Administrative Divisions: 99 Counties; National Representatives: 6 seats; Electoral Votes: 8
KANSAS

Admitted
January 29, 1861
Order - 34th
Derived from the Sioux word for those who lived south the "south wind people" of their territory, which was mainly Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota. First European Permanent Settlement: 1727; Capitol: Topeka; Administrative Divisions: 105 Counties; National Representatives: 5 seats; Electoral Votes: 7
KENTUCKY

Admitted
June 1, 1792
Order - 15th
Originally the term for the Kentucky plains in Clark County, Kentucky is believed to derive from the Indian word meaning "dark and bloody ground", "meadow land," or "land of tomorrow." First European Permanent Settlement: 1774; Capitol: Frankfort; Administrative Divisions: 120 Counties; National Representatives: 7 seats; Electoral Votes: 9
LOUISIANA

Admitted
April 30, 1812
Order - 18th
Seceded
January 26, 1861
Readmission
June 25, 1868
Present-day Louisiana is just a fraction of the territory that was named for the French King Louis XIV by Sieur de La Salle. First European Permanent Settlement: 1699; Capitol: Baton Rouge; Administrative Divisions: 64 Parishes; National Representatives: 8 seats; Electoral Votes: 10
MAINE

Admitted
March 15, 1820
Order - 23rd
Originally a French territory, Maine was the ancient French word for "province." It is also believed that it refers to the mainland, as distinct from the many islands off the state's coast. First European Permanent Settlement: 1624; Capitol: Augusta; Administrative Divisions: 16 Counties; National Representatives: 2 seats; Electoral Votes: 4
MARYLAND

Admitted
April 28, 1788
7th of the 13 original States
Named for Queen Henrietta Maria, wife of Charles I of England. First European Permanent Settlement: 1634; Capitol: Annapolis 31,740. 1980 Pop; Administrative Divisions: 23 Counties; 1 Independent city; National Representatives: 8 seats; Electoral Votes: 10
MASSACHUSETTS

Admitted
February 6, 1788
6th of the 13 original States
The name of the Indian tribe that lived near Milton, Massachusetts, meaning "large hill place." First European Permanent Settlement: 1620; Capitol: Boston; Administrative Divisions: 14 Counties; National Representatives: 11 seats; Electoral Votes: 13
MICHIGAN

Admitted
January 26, 1837
Order - 26th
Believed to be from the Chippewa word micigama, meaning "great water," after Lake Michigan, although Alouet defined it in 1672 as designating a clearing. First European Permanent Settlement: 1668;Capitol: Lansing; Administrative Divisions: 83 Counties; National Representatives: 18 seats; Electoral Votes: 20
MINNESOTA

Admitted
May 11, 1858
Order - 32nd
Named from the Sioux description of the Minnesota River, "sky-tinted water" or "muddy water." First European Permanent Settlement: 1805; Capitol: Saint Paul; Administrative Divisions: 87 Counties; National Representatives: 8 seats; Electoral Votes: 10
MISSISSIPPI

Admitted
December 10, 1817
Order - 20th
Seceded
January 9, 1861
4th of 11 states
Readmission
February 23, 1870
10th of 11 states
Most likely derived from the Chippewa words mici great and zibi river, it was first written by La Salle's lieutenant Henri de Tonti as "Michi Sepe." First European Permanent Settlement: 1699; Capitol: Jackson; Administrative Divisions: 82 Counties; National Representatives: 5 seats; Electoral Votes: 7
MISSOURI

Admitted
August 10, 1821
Order - 24th
Meaning "muddy water," this state is named after an Algonquin Indian tribe. First European Permanent Settlement: 1735; Capitol: Jefferson City; Administrative Divisions: 114 Counties; 1 Independent city; National Representatives: 9 seats; Electoral Votes: 11
MONTANA

Admitted
November 8, 1889
Order - 41st
Derived from the Latin word meaning "mountainous." First European Permanent Settlement: 1809; Capitol: Helena; Administrative Divisions: 56 Counties; National Representatives: 2 seats; Electoral Votes: 4
NEBRASKA

Admitted
March 1, 1867
Order - 37th
Descriptive of the Platte River, Nebraska is from the Omaha or Otos Indian word for "broad water" or "flat river." First European Permanent Settlement: 1823; Capitol: Lincoln; Administrative Divisions: 93 Counties; National Representatives: 3 seats; Electoral Votes: 5
NEVADA

Admitted
October 31, 1864
Order - 36th
Spanish word meaning "snow clad." First European Permanent Settlement: 1849; Capitol: Carson City; Administrative Divisions: 16 Counties; 1 Independent city; National Representatives: 2 seats; Electoral Votes: 4
NEW HAMPSHIRE

Admitted
June 21, 1788
9th of original 13 states
Captain John Mason named this colony for his home county in England in 1629. First European Permanent Settlement: 1623; Capitol: Concord; Administrative Divisions: 10 Counties; National Representatives: 2 seats; Electoral Votes: 4
NEW JERSEY

Admitted
December 18, 1787
3rd of original 13 states
Named after the Isle of Jersey in England by John Berkley and Sir George Carteret. First European Permanent Settlement: 1664; Capitol: Trenton; Administrative Divisions: 21 Counties; National Representatives: 14 seats; Electoral Votes: 16
NEW MEXICO

Admitted
January 6, 1912
Order - 47th
Named by the Spanish for the territory north and west of the Rio Grande. First European Permanent Settlement: 1610; Capitol: Santa Fe; Administrative Divisions: 33 Counties; National Representatives: 3 seats; Electoral Votes: 5
NEW YORK

Admitted
July 26, 1788
11th of 13 original states
Originally named New Netherland, New York was later named after the Duke of York and Albany, who received a patent to the region from his brother Charles II of England and captured it from the Dutch in 1644. First European Permanent Settlement: 1614; Capitol: Albany; Administrative Divisions: 62 Counties; National Representatives: 34 seats; Electoral Votes: 36
NORTH CAROLINA

Admitted
November 21, 1789
12th of original 13 states
Seceded
May 20, 1861
10th of 11 states
Readmission
June 25, 1868
7th of 11 states
From the Latin name Carolus, meaning "Charles." The colony was originally given to Sir Robert Heath by Charles I and was to be called Province of Carolana. Carolana was divided into North and South Carolina in 1710. First European Permanent Settlement: 1660; Capitol: Raleigh; Administrative Divisions: 100 Counties; National Representatives: 11 seats; Electoral Votes: 13
NORTH DAKOTA

Admitted
November 2, 1889
Order - 39th
From the Sioux word meaning "friend" or "ally." First European Permanent Settlement: 1812; Capitol: Bismark; Administrative Divisions: 53 Counties; National Representatives: 1 seat; Electoral Votes: 3
OHIO

Recognized as a state
March 1, 1803
Officially admitted to the Union August 7, 1953
by Act of Congress,
Retroactive to
March 1, 1803

Order - 17th
From an Iroquois Indian word variously meaning "great," "fine," "good river." First European Permanent Settlement: 1788; Capitol: Columbus; Administrative Divisions: 88 Counties; National Representatives: 21 seats; Electoral Votes: 23
OKLAHOMA

Admitted
November 16, 1907
Order - 46th
From the Choctaw Indian word meaning "red man," which was coined by the Reverend Allen Wright, a Choctaw-speaking Indian. First European Permanent Settlement: 1889; Capitol: Oklahoma City; Administrative Divisions: 77 Counties; National Representatives: 6 seats; Electoral Votes: 8
OREGON

Admitted
February 14, 1859
Order - 33rd
Though its exact origin is unclear, one theory maintains that it may have been a variation on the name of the Wisconsin River, which was called Ouaricon-sint on a French map dated 1715. Later, the English explorer Major Robert Rogers named a river "called by the Indians Ouragon" in his request to seek a Northwest Passage from the Great Lakes. Another theory derives the word from the Algonquin wauregan, meaning "beautiful water." First European Permanent Settlement: 1811; Capitol: Salem; Administrative Divisions: 36 Counties; National Representatives: 5 seats; Electoral Votes: 7
PENNSYLVANIA

Admitted
December 12, 1787
2nd of 13 original states
Named after the colony's founder, the Quaker William Penn. The literal translation is "Penn's woods." First European Permanent Settlement: 1682; Capitol: Harrisburg; Administrative Divisions: 67 Counties; National Representatives: 23 seats; Electoral Votes: 25
RHODE ISLAND

Admitted
May 29, 1790
13th of 13 original states
Possibly named by Giovanni de Verrazano, who charted an island about the size of an island of the same name in the Mediterranean. Another theory suggests Rhode Island was named Roode Eylandt by Dutch explorer Adrian Block because of its red clay.First European Permanent Settlement: 1636; Capitol: Providence; Administrative Divisions: 5 Counties; National Representatives: 2 seats; Electoral Votes: 4
SOUTH CAROLINA

Admitted
May 23, 1788
8th of 13 original states
Seceded
December 20, 1860
1st of 11 states
Readmission
June 25, 1868
8th of 11 states
From the Latin name Carolus, meaning "Charles." The colony was originally given to Sir Robert Heath by Charles I and was to be called Province of Carolana. Carolana was divided into North and South Carolina in 1710. First European Permanent Settlement: 1670; Capitol: Columbia; Administrative Divisions: 46 Counties; National Representatives: 6 seats; Electoral Votes: 8
SOUTH DAKOTA

Admitted
November 2, 1889
Order - 40th
From the Sioux word meaning "friend" or "ally." First European Permanent Settlement: 1859; Capitol: Pierre; Administrative Divisions: 67 Counties; National Representatives: 1 seat; Electoral Votes: 3
TENNESSEE

Admitted
June 1, 1796
Order - 16th
Seceded
June 8, 1861
11th of 11 states
Readmission
July 24, 1866
1st of 11 states
The state of Franklin, or Frankland, from 1784 to 1788, it was finally named after the Cherokee villages called Tanasi on the Little Tennessee River. First European Permanent Settlement: 1769; Capitol: Nashville; Administrative Divisions: 95 Counties; National Representatives: 9 seats; Electoral Votes: 11
TEXAS

Admitted
December 29, 1845
Order - 28th
Seceded
February 1, 1861
7th of 11 states
Readmission
March 30, 1870
11th of 11 states
Also written texias, tejas, and teysas, Texas is a variation on the Caddo Indian word for "friend" or "ally." First European Permanent Settlement: 1682; Capitol: Austin; Administrative Divisions: 254 Counties; National Representatives: 27 seats; Electoral Votes: 29
UTAH

Admitted
January 4, 1896
Order - 45th
Meaning "upper" or "higher," Utah is derived from a name used by the Navajos Utes to designate a Shoshone tribe. First European Permanent Settlement: 1847; Capitol: Salt Lake City; Administrative Divisions: 29 Counties; National Representatives: 3 seats; Electoral Votes: 5
VERMONT

Admitted
March 4, 1791
Order - 14th
It is believed Samuel de Champlain coined the name from the French words vert green and mont mountain. Later, Dr. Thomas Young proposed this name when the state was formed in 1777. First European Permanent Settlement: 1724; Capitol: Montpelier; Administrative Divisions: 14 Counties; National Representatives: 1 seat; Electoral Votes: 3
VIRGINIA

Admitted
June 25, 1788
10th of 13 original states
Seceded
April 17, 1861
8th of 11 states
Readmission
January 26, 1870
9th of 11 states
Named for the Virgin Queen of England, Queen Elizabeth I, by Sir Walter Raleigh, who first visited its shores in 1584. First European Permanent Settlement: 1607; Capitol: Richmond; Administrative Divisions: 95 Counties; 41 Independent cities; National Representatives: 10 seats; Electoral Votes: 12
WASHINGTON

Admitted
November 11, 1889
Order - 42nd
Originally named the territory of Columbia, it was changed to Washington in honor of the first U.S. President because of the already existing District of Columbia. First European Permanent Settlement: 1811; Capitol: Olympia; Administrative Divisions: 39 Counties; National Representatives: 8 seats; Electoral Votes: 10
WEST VIRGINIA

Admitted
June 20, 1863
Order - 35th
Named when this area refused to secede from the Union in 1863. First European Permanent Settlement: 1727; Capitol: Charleston; Administrative Divisions: 55 Counties; National Representatives: 4 seats; Electoral Votes: 6
WISCONSIN

Admitted
May 29, 1848
Order - 30th
A Chippewa/Ojibwa word that was spelled Ouisconsin and Mesconsing by early explorers. Wisconsin was formally named by Congress when it became a state. First European Permanent Settlement: 1766; Capitol: Madison; Administrative Divisions: 72 Counties; National Representatives: 9 seats; Electoral Votes: 11
WYOMING

Admitted
July 10, 1890
Order - 44th
The Algonquin word meaning "large prairie place," the name was adopted from Wyoming Valley, Pennsylvania, the site of an Indian massacre. It was widely known from Thomas Campbell's poem "Gertrude of Wyoming." First European Permanent Settlement: 1834; Capitol: Cheyenne; Administrative Divisions: 23 Counties; National Representatives: 1 seat; Electoral Votes: 3



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